What are some quotes from Fahrenheit 451 that shows knowledge can help people in their society?

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In Part Two, Montag visits Faber's home in hopes that the ex-professor can help him comprehend the texts that he has been reading. Before Faber explains the importance of literature, he comments on the positives of preserving knowledge to improve their superficial, destructive society. Faber tells Montag,

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In Part Two, Montag visits Faber's home in hopes that the ex-professor can help him comprehend the texts that he has been reading. Before Faber explains the importance of literature, he comments on the positives of preserving knowledge to improve their superficial, destructive society. Faber tells Montag,

We do need knowledge. And perhaps in a thousand years we might pick smaller cliffs to jump off. The books are to remind us what asses and fools we are (Bradbury, 40).

Faber believes that by preserving knowledge, humans will be able to learn from their mistakes and improve the standard of living nationwide as society progresses. Faber goes on to tell Montag,

They're Caesar's praetorian guard, whispering as the parade roars down the avenue, `Remember, Caesar, thou art mortal.' Most of us can't rush around, talking to everyone, know all the cities of the world, we haven't time, money or that many friends (Bradbury, 40).

In Part Three, Montag flees the dystopian city and joins a group of traveling intellectuals, who preserve knowledge by remembering complete works of literature. Granger makes a similar comment when he elaborates on the importance of literature. Granger also feels that humans should preserve knowledge in order to avoid making the same mistakes over and over. Granger compares mankind to a phoenix and tells Montag,

We know all the damn silly things we've done for a thousand years, and as long as we know that and always have it around where we can see it, someday we'll stop making the goddam funeral pyres and jumping into the middle of them (Bradbury, 76).

Overall, Montag, Faber, and Granger believe that knowledge is important to advance society and mankind as a whole. Without having books to preserve knowledge of the past, humans will continue to make the same mistakes and mankind will suffer.

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