What qoute represents stepping in someone else's shoes in To Kill a Mockingbird?

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litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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An example of someone in someone else’s shoes is when Scout stands on the Radley porch at the end of the novel.

Scout has learned a lot by the end of the book.  Early on, she had trouble getting along with her first grade teacher.  Her father Atticus gave her some helpful advice.

“[If] you can learn a simple trick, Scout, you'll get along a lot better with all kinds of folks. You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view-…-until you climb into his skin and walk around in it." (ch 3)

The importance of looking at things from another person's perspective is one of the main themes of the book.  As Scout matures, she begins to see things from others’ perspective.  She has difficulty at first understanding her brother and Mrs. Dubose.  However, during the trial of Tom Robinson she makes a breakthrough when she empathizes with Mayella Ewell, realizing that she is lonely.

At the end of the book, Scout finally gets to meet the mysterious Boo Radley.  He turns out to be a gentle and shy man.  She walks him home, and stands on his porch.  She imagines the events of  the book from his perspective, and really stands in his skin.

Atticus was right. One time he said you never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them. Just standing on the Radley porch was enough. (ch 31)

Scout imagines Boo watching them in their play of his life, seeing them trying to get up the courage to get him to come out, leaving them presents in the tree, placing a blanket on Scout’s shoulders, and rescuing them  from Bob Ewell.  She understands him.

Empathy is an important part of the human experience, and learning empathy is a big part of growing up.  Scout realizes that she has come to understand other people’s perspectives, which is a very adult thing to do.

 

Note:  I know you asked for more than one quote, but enotes educators can only give you one.  You should be able to find some others once I explain this, or you can post it as a discussion or post another question.  When you want several points of view, a discussion post is useful.

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