What are some positive aspects about society in 1984?

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The positive thing about 1984 is that Winston has a job and is a member of a society. He seems to have a better job than some, at least he works with his mind. There is technology available, he has his own apartment. Other than that, the only positive in...

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The positive thing about 1984 is that Winston has a job and is a member of a society. He seems to have a better job than some, at least he works with his mind. There is technology available, he has his own apartment. Other than that, the only positive in the environment is that Winston is living in a society where all the wars (the constant wars) are happening far away. Winston doesn't seem affected by the wars directly, so his society is safe in that regard.

1984 doesn't seek to be comforting, but in several aspects it mirrors present day, and the present day of George Orwell when he wrote the book in 1949. He feared that Great Britain, long an independent nation (really a conglomeration of states in the British Isles) would become gobbled up by a larger structure called Eurasia. In some respects, this came to pass, as the euro replaced pounds, franks, and Deutsch marks - the currency of Britain, France, and Germany (among others). Recently, the "Brexit" movement has been about Britain reclaiming its identity.

Orwell also saw the rise of technology and surveillance, which has come to pass in London - the most photographed and filmed city in the world. He based this on the government's reaction to crime and terrorism, and that is the justification for cameras in public places.

He also foresaw the massive growth of bureaucracy in huge 'ministries' that controlled aspects of citizens daily life. This, too, is a reality for citizens of Great Britain and many other western countries. It is difficult to live outside the bureaucracies that require insurance (auto and health), education (college degrees), and housing (bank mortgages). Citizens must get IDs or driver's licenses to show to police. The police state, too, has become more entrenched, stockpiling more powerful weaponry and has become militarized to some extent. SWAT teams are an example - these did not exist in 1949.

There is little good in Winston's world, except stability.

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I would say that one thing that could be considered positive is safety. As long as people in Oceania live according to the standard, as long as they fit into what is appropriate for their society, they are unified and protected.

In America we give up freedom for safety all the time. This may not be positive in the sense that it is desirable, but it is a reality that is not entirely negative. Alexis de Tocqueville discusses the idea of sacrificing freedom for safety in his work "Democracy in America"

http://www.enotes.com/nineteenth-century-criticism/tocqueville-alexis-charles-henri-maurice-clerel

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I don't think there are any, but that depends on what you would define as "positive."  The proles have the most positive life if you think of postive as being "free" to live as you please, even if most of the tasks that you perform are menial and there is no larger purpose to your existence.  The Inner party has a positive life if you define that as exercising power and control over all other members of society.  The Outer party members seem to have the least positive life.  They have none of the "freedom" of the Proles and none of the "control"  of the Inner party.  Orwell seems to have created the society without positives ... but perhaps that what he had in mind.  Please let me know if your question had a direction I missed ... and perhaps someone else will be able to answer it in another way.

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