What are some of the poetic elements in Anne Bradstreet's "To My Dear and Loving Husband"?

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The first poetic element (I’m more used to the term “poetic device”) appears in the repetition of the phrase “If ever..., then...” in the first three lines and, in a different form, in the final two lines. This repetition is called anaphora.

A second poetic element that you might...

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The first poetic element (I’m more used to the term “poetic device”) appears in the repetition of the phrase “If ever..., then...” in the first three lines and, in a different form, in the final two lines. This repetition is called anaphora.

A second poetic element that you might point out is the fixed rhyme scheme. The poem is organized around rhyming couplets, and there are a total of twelve lines.

A third poetic element is the regular meter of the poem. This meter is called iambic pentameter. It’s pentameter because there are five stressed syllables per line. It’s iambic because of the alternating unstressed and stressed syllables: “If EV-er TWO were ONE, then SURE-ly WE.”

I like this poem as an example of Early Modern English, a stage of the English language in which people were still using forms like "thou" and "doth" and were capitalizing words seemingly at random.

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