What are some passages about friendship in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird?

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The theme of friendship in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird can especially be characterized through the children's relationship with Dill. Dill is a very unusual person, yet there are several places throughout the novel where both Jem and Scout express their acceptance of him, which also ...

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The theme of friendship in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird can especially be characterized through the children's relationship with Dill.

Dill is a very unusual person, yet there are several places throughout the novel where both Jem and Scout express their acceptance of him, which also expresses their friendship with him. For example, in Chapter 16, the morning after the mob scene, Dill comes rushing into the Finches' dining room, bursting with news of the gossip spreading all over town about how they handled the mob, saying, "It's all over town this morning ... all about how we held off a hundred folks with our bare hands." When Aunt Alexandra icily corrects him, Jem defends Dill's creative method of expressing himself, saying in Dill's defense, "Aw, Aunty, that's just Dill's way" (Ch. 16). Jem's defense of Dill shows us how much Jem appreciates Dill and values his friendship.

Earlier, at the start of summer after her second grade year, Scout expresses sorrow to learn by letter that Dill's mother wants him to stay in Meridian that summer to spend time with his new stepfather. Scout is gloomy for two days after reading the news and reflects the following:

I had never thought about it, but summer was Dill by the fishpool smoking string, Dill's eyes alive with complicated plans to make Boo Radley emerge; summer was the swiftness with which Dill would reach up and kiss me when Jem was not looking, the longings we sometimes felt for each other. With him, life was routine; without him, life was unbearable. (Ch. 12)

While this passage speaks of affections Scout feels for Dill that go beyond friendship, what is also true is that these feelings developed because of their friendship. Therefore, Scout missing Dill clearly portrays how much she values her friendship with him.

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At the very end of the novel, Scout is narrating: "He would be in Jem's room all night, and he would be there in the morning."  Closing the novel out, and further cementing Atticus' standing as a rock-solid father figure.

Atticus and Scout are having a discussion on why Scout needs to continue her education, when she doesn't think she needs to.  Atticus says "Do you know what a compromise is?"  To which Scout replies  "Bendin' the law?"  Atticus responds  "Umm...no.  It's an aggreement reached by mutual consent.  Now here's the way it works.  You concede the necessity of goin' to school, and we'll keep right on readin', the same as we always have.  Is that a bargain?"

Finally, the reprehensible Bob Ewell is telling Atticus he's sorry he was put in the position he was in.  "I'm sorry they picked you to defend that n----r that raped my Mayella.  I don't know why I didn't kill him myself instead of goin' to the sheriff."

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