What are some modern interpretations of Macbeth Act I, Scenes I, II and III?I chose to do an excerpt from the play, the first three scenes from Act I and I have some ideas about making the modern...

What are some modern interpretations of Macbeth Act I, Scenes I, II and III?

I chose to do an excerpt from the play, the first three scenes from Act I and I have some ideas about making the modern one in a business environment but I can't understand what the scenes are about in the original version.

Asked on by kim-c

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missjenn's profile pic

missjenn | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Adjunct Educator

Posted on

I also like to direct you towards two film resources you may find helpful. There is an Australian film called "Macbeth" released in 2006 which is a modern day tale, but the battle grounds are clubs and drug turf. In my opinion is it an excellent modern re-visioning of Macbeth, especially because they kept the original language that Shakespeare used. Second, there is an older movie called "Scotland, PA." This film is set around a business owner and the invention of the drive through window. So think fast food meets Shakespeare. However this version does not keep Shakespeare's language, rather it modernizes that. Hope this gives you some ideas!

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nusratfarah's profile pic

nusratfarah | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted on

The first three scenes of Macbeth introduce most of the principal characters, like - Macbeth, the "weird sisters", Duncan, and Banquo, and these scenes give a short but powerful portrayal of Macbeth's ambitious character and his evil intentions.

Shakespeare's Macbeth mainly deals with ambition or power-game. Assassination, or plotting to assassinate powerful somebody in order to have the control over the authority, especially remaining extremely close and trustworthy one to that person, has become a very common aspect of modern world. In fact, having intense ambition and the will to do whatever necessary to achieve power also prevail in today's world. Macbeth seems to have such extreme devilish intention who rears his ambition underneath his true face, keeping himself a very reliable and faithful subordinate to the king.

His ambition is clearly depicted in the three scenes mentioned in your questions, especially when he utters: "Two truths are told / As happy prologues..." (1.3), and says further:

"If good, why do I yield.../ Present fears/ Are less than horrible imaginings:/ My thought, whose Murder yet is but fantastical,..." (1.3)

The modern aspects of Macbeth can be interpreted through this angle. I'll also suggest you to travel through the given link.

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