Fahrenheit 451 Questions and Answers
by Ray Bradbury

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What are some metaphor and allusion examples in Fahrenheit 451?  

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Though the dystopia shown in Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 (1953) wants to destroy all written words, paradoxically, the firemen assigned to this job often use metaphors and allusions in their speech. This itself is a sly metaphor about the power of books; even as the firemen burn texts, words and ideas from them are burnt into their brains. Thus, metaphors and allusions operate at several levels in Bradbury’s novel. An example of the complex way Bradbury uses metaphor is the following lines, in which the protagonist, Montag, recalls his captain, Beatty, describing the pleasures of book burning:

“Sit down, Montag. Watch. Delicately, like the petals of a flower. Light the first page, light the second page. Each becomes a black butterfly. Beautiful, eh?” ... There sat Beatty, perspiring gently, the floor littered with swarms of black moths that had died in a single storm.

For Beatty, the intact pages are as delicate as flowers, yet the killed pages are even more beautiful, fluttering...

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