What are some major quotes of the narrator from "A Rose for Emily"? I need quotes to show as evidence of how the narrator told his version of the life of Miss Emily. I need their...

What are some major quotes of the narrator from "A Rose for Emily"?

I need quotes to show as evidence of how the narrator told his version of the life of Miss Emily. I need their perspective. I need to show evidence as to why I think the narrator is superficial, hiding the truth of the town's guilt for not being more involved.

Asked on by oldschool

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bmadnick's profile pic

bmadnick | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

Since the narrator represents the town, he/she most likely is also representing the town's feelings. He/she is sympathetic toward Miss Emily and the people of Jefferson, not wanting to place blame. "Miss Emily had been a tradition, a duty, and a care; a sort of hereditary obligation upon the town." The following are some of the quotes you might use.
"When Miss Emily Grierson died, our whole town went to her funeral; the men through a sort of respectful affection for a fallen monument, the women mostly out of curiosity to see the inside of her house."
When the town found out that Miss Emily had no money, "people were glad. At last they could pity Miss Emily. . . . she had become humanized."
When Miss Emily began appearing in public with Homer Barron, the ladies sent the Baptist minister to talk with her. No one knows what was said in the meeting, but the minister would not go back.
"We did not even know she was sick; we had long since given up trying to get any information from the Negro."

Throughout the story, the narrator reflects the curiosity about Miss Emily and the nosiness of most the ladies in Jefferson. As she ages, the new generations don't look upon her with the same respect, signifying the decaying of the Old South as well. Could any of the ladies have tried to go visit her? Would she have let them? What was the town's responsibility toward her?

Go to the enotes link below for more information.

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lnorton's profile pic

lnorton | College Teacher | (Level 3) Adjunct Educator

Posted on

This question is difficult to answer based on your phraseology -- here's why. The narrator in ARFE is a first-person plural construction -- this means that it is told from a "we," or community perspective. Because of this, the voice of the narrator has access to information gathered by various members of the town and is used to represent community experience. Thus, guilt would be community guilt, hiding would  be a community effort, etc.

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