What are some literary devices used in Twelfth Night Act 1 Scenes 3 and 4?

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Shakespeare's Twelfth Night is a play that has several meditations on love and identity. In this play, many literary devices are employed.

In act 1, scene 3, Maria cautions Sir Toby Belch about his excessive drinking because his cousin, the Countess Olivia, disapproves of his behavior. Also, the countess did not approve of the man with Sir Toby the night before, especially after learning that he was supposedly a possible husband for her. Sir Toby defends his friend, Sir Andrew Aguecheek, in a simile: "He’s as tall a man as any’s in Illyria" (1.3.15). Here, the word tall has been defined in some texts as "brave."

As Maria and Sir Toby continue their conversation, both speak lines containing alliteration , a literary device that repeats a consonant sound and serves to speed up the line or sentence. Maria, for instance, tells Sir Toby that his friend Sir Andrew is a fool: "He's a great quarreller; and but that he hath the gift of a coward to allay the gust he hath the gift of a grave"...

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