What are some literary devices that Harriet Beecher Stowe uses in Uncle Tom's Cabin to show the evils of slavery?

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The evils of slavery become most profound after Uncle Tom is sold to the evil Simon Legree. Tom and the other newly-purchased slaves can feel nothing but emptiness, dreariness, and foreboding as they come closer to their new "home." One device Stowe uses to reflect their misery is pathetic fallacy, where landscape or nature mirrors the emotional state of characters:

the wind whispered mournfully, and now over log causeways, through long cypress swamps, the doleful trees rising out of the slimy, spongy ground, hung with long wreaths of funeral black moss, while ever and anon the loathsome form of the moccasin snake might be seen sliding among broken stumps and shattered branches that lay here and there, rotting in the water.

Like the souls of the slaves, nature itself is mournful, broken, and shattered.

Throughout the book, Stowe uses imagery , which is description using...

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