What are some literary devices found in Macbeth, Act 3 (scene 4)?

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D. Reynolds eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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In this scene, Shakespeare uses the literary device of dramatic irony. We as an audience have been given the information that Banquo is dead, but the guests at the party have no idea of it. They see Macbeth acting very strangely, but he brushes it off as a childhood infirmity. Then he drinks a toast to Banquo. The guests join in, not knowing as we do that the man they are cheerfully toasting is dead. Another example of dramatic irony is that while we as an audience know that Macbeth is seeing Banquo's ghost, the guests are utterly confused and can't understand what Macbeth is going on about.

Macbeth uses hyperbole too in addressing the ghost, stating that even the most fearsome creatures in nature would not be frightening to him when compared to the ghost: 

Approach thou like the rugged Russian bear,
The armed rhinoceros, or th' Hyrcan tiger;
Take any shape but that, and my firm nerves
Shall never tremble.
Shakespeare also employs rhyming couplets  to add drama and emphasis near the end of the...

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