What are some important quotes throughout A Clockwork Orange?

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What a superb device he can be, this boy. If anything, of course, he could for preference look even iller and more zombyish than he does. Anything for the cause.

This quotation comes from Z. Dolin, one of the anti-government rebels working with F. Alexander to overthrow the regime. It's a significant statement, as it says something about the dissidents' paradoxical attitude toward liberty. Alexander and his confederates are supposed to be committed to the cause of liberty, and yet they show no hesitation in cynically using Alex for their own ends. In other words, they display the exact same attitude as the authoritarian regime they've vowed to destroy. They seem to think, just like the government, that the individual can be sacrificed for a higher cause. Only in Alexander and Dolin's case, that cause is—ironically—freedom for the individual.

What Burgess ably does here is to satirize the tendency of self-confessed liberators of humankind—such as Communists, for instance—to become like their avowed enemies, manipulating others for their own ends in violation of what are supposed to be their most deeply held convictions.

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One of the most important quotes in this book comes from the writings of F. Alexander, which Alex reads before he beats up the writer and then rapes his wife. F. Alexander has very strong notions regarding society and what should and shouldn't be done by society in the name of trying to create peace:

The attempt to impose upon man, a creature of growth and capable of sweetness, to ooze juicily at the last round the bearded lips of God, to attempt to impose, I say, laws and conditions appropriate to a mechanical creation, against this I raise my sword-pen.

F. Alexander therefore criticises the way in which his society is trying to limit the freedom of individuals, even bad individuals, through the use of technology. Alex initially ignores this passage but he later returns to think about it when his own free will is something that is stripped from him by the state.

This quote, and how it relates to the novel, makes it clear that this is a story that is essentially about the importance of free will. For us to be human, Burgess seems to argue, we need to have free will. For us to have free will, it therefore follows that we have to acknowledge that some people may choose evil rather than embrace good. Alex is of course a classic example of this. Trying to take away somebody's free will, which is what happens to Alex, makes him less of a human.

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