What are some historical or current events that best describe or support the quote "Birds of a Feather Flock Together"?No personal experiences, please.

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clairewait's profile pic

clairewait | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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There is a huge online movement both nationally and internationally for moms to connect to other moms.  International websites like cafemom.com (you've probably seen the commercials on TV) and national networks like "The Mommy Network" have brought mothers of all ages, races, backgrounds, and parenting philosophies together to get/give advice, meet one another, and support each other.

It has been very interesting to me to find how many of the concerns, questions, and general discussions are nearly identical across the board.  It seems moms all over the world are having similar life experiences and worries, and the internet has been one of the first tools to connect them to one another.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/alltechconsidered/2009/07/mom_bloggers_are_spreading_inf.html

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Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

The saying "Birds of a feather flock together" is applicable to all kinds of unlikely pairings for current events issues. Think about the Tea Party movement, for example. Despite the attempts to stereotype all of them as radical conservatives who live in the South, carry their guns and Bibles proudly, and want to convert the government to a theocracy, members of this movement are quite diverse. They are young and old; they are not all just white; they live all over the country; they come from every occupation and economic background; and their issues are varied. What they share, though, is discontent with the status quo--business as usual--and they want change.

On a different note, I was struck this month by the diversity of people who are opposed to the enhanced security practices at airports. Those who have disabilitites and illnesses which are problematic with the new procedures join those who are concerned about the privacy issues, among others. An unexpected grouping. Good question.

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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I would say that you can look at some alliances between nations to argue that birds of a feather flock together.

For example, during World War II, you could say that the Nazis and the Japanese were, in a way, birds of a feather.  Both regimes were willing to commit brutal actions against those who they saw as their inferiors (the Jews for the Nazis, Allied POWs as well as all Chinese and Koreans for the Japanese).  If you accept that they were similar in this way, then they constitute an example of birds of a feather flocking together.

I suppose that you could say that the US's long-standing alliance with Great Britain is another example.  These two countries are "birds of a feather" in terms of language, governmental traditions, and many aspects of culture.  Because of this, we have shared a "special relationship" since at least World War I.

cypressbonding's profile pic

cypressbonding | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

I would say that you can look at some alliances between nations to argue that birds of a feather flock together.

For example, during World War II, you could say that the Nazis and the Japanese were, in a way, birds of a feather.  Both regimes were willing to commit brutal actions against those who they saw as their inferiors (the Jews for the Nazis, Allied POWs as well as all Chinese and Koreans for the Japanese).  If you accept that they were similar in this way, then they constitute an example of birds of a feather flocking together.

I suppose that you could say that the US's long-standing alliance with Great Britain is another example.  These two countries are "birds of a feather" in terms of language, governmental traditions, and many aspects of culture.  Because of this, we have shared a "special relationship" since at least World War I.

Thank you for your much-needed help.

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