What are some quotes concerning Hamlet's madness in Hamlet?

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Shortly after he first sees the ghost, Hamlet tells Horatio he will pretend to be mad (crazy). He calls this seeming madness "an antic disposition":

How strange or odd some'er I bear myself
(As I perchance hereafter shall think meet
To put an antic disposition on)

He will be doing this to confuse the people around him as he investigates and determines what to do about the ghost's revelation. He also knows the shocking news will affect him emotionally, and people will notice this, so he wants them to have an explanation for his behavior. This is an instance of dramatic irony, in which the audience knows what most of the characters in the play do not.

I am but mad north-north-west: when the wind is
southerly, I know a hawk from a handsaw.

Hamlet says this to "play" or deceive to fawning courtiers Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, but as Claudius will later note, there's a method to Hamlet's madness. Hamlet is telling these men he is only mad sometimes: when the wind comes from the right direction (he is...

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