What are some good pieces of evidence proving that Dill is the main symbol of innocence in To Kill a Mockingbird?I basically have "he's always happy" and "he tells Scout that they're to be married...

What are some good pieces of evidence proving that Dill is the main symbol of innocence in To Kill a Mockingbird?

I basically have "he's always happy" and "he tells Scout that they're to be married via letter" (which makes me laugh). Anything else would be fantastic.

1 Answer | Add Yours

bullgatortail's profile pic

bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I totally agree that Dill is the main symbol of child innocence in To Kill a Mockingbird, but, I would disagree that Dill is always happy. He is certainly not a happy boy when he runs away from home in Chapter 15. This action does give additional evidence of his lost innocence, however. At first excited about his mother remarrying, his new father proves to be a cruel man, if you can believe Dill's extreme exaggerations, who chains him in the basement. Dill escapes the torture by making the long trek alone from Meridian to Maycomb. It is another example of the abuse and unhappiness that is heaped on Dill at such a young age, and the steps he will take to return to the one place where he is happy. Additionally, Dill has yet to understand that Scout and Jem don't believe his tall tales, which are meant to deflect the reality of being a child whose parents have no time for him.

Dill's innocence can be seen again during the trial, when he begins crying and has to leave with Scout because of the prosecutor's callous treatment of Tom Robinson. Dolphus Raymond recognizes that Dill is still a child who, in a few years, will no longer cry when he sees hatred perpetrated against another; experience in a cruel world will change all of that, he suggests. 

Previously, Dill's innocence can be seen in his fascination with Boo Radley. Dill believes all of the stories he is told about Boo, who he compares with a monster akin to Dracula, the movie that he has so proudly seen.

We’ve answered 318,912 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question