What is an example of simile in Fahrenheit 451?

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In part 1, Mildred tells Guy that she thinks Clarisse is dead. Guy is in shock as his wife quickly says goodnight, and then he hears a sound:

It was like a breath exhaled upon the window. It was like a faint drift of greenish luminescent smoke , the...

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In part 1, Mildred tells Guy that she thinks Clarisse is dead. Guy is in shock as his wife quickly says goodnight, and then he hears a sound:

It was like a breath exhaled upon the window. It was like a faint drift of greenish luminescent smoke, the motion of a single huge October leaf blowing across the lawn and away.

The simile here reinforces the transparency of the constant surveillance that Guy faces. It is always there—almost. Never quite sure when he is being overheard or monitored directly, Guy grows suspicious that the Hound is just outside his window. He is so frightened that he doesn't open the window to check.

Later, Beatty visits Guy, and as they talk, this description is given:

Beatty knocked his pipe into the palm of his pink hand, studied the ashes as if they were a symbol to be diagnosed and searched for meaning.

This action occurs just before Beatty tells Guy that people really don't want the truth; they simply want to be happy. This simile shows the ominous meaning behind his words. He analyzes the ashes in much the same way literary students once analyzed symbols in books.

Just before Guy goes home to face his wife and her friends, he provides this reflection:

You could feel the war getting ready in the sky that night. The way the clouds moved aside and came back, and the way the stars looked, a million of them swimming between the clouds, like the enemy disks, and the feeling that the sky might all up on the city and turn it to chalk dust, and the moon go up in red fire; that was how the night felt.

This comparison of the stars to something evil shows how Guy feels utterly surrounded by forces larger than himself at this point, forces beyond his control. Like the stars on this night, they have the power to illuminate the truth: Guy Montag no longer believes in the work of firemen.

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A simile is a literary device that makes a direct comparison between two things using the words "like" or "as." Bradbury uses a litany of similes throughout his classic novel Fahrenheit 451, which allow the reader to imagine and experience what the author is saying.

While Montag is visiting Faber before he leaves the dystopian city, Faber turns on a small television, which shows a helicopter lowering a new Mechanical Hound to search for Montag. Bradbury utilizes a simile by writing,

And there on the small screen was the burnt house, and the crowd, and something with a sheet over it and out of the sky, fluttering, came the helicopter like a grotesque flower.

Bradbury is comparing the image of the helicopter blades spinning at a fast speed to a "grotesque flower."

When Montag initially meets Granger and is introduced to the traveling group of intellectuals, Granger utilizes a simile when he tells Montag, "You'll stink like a bobcat." After fleeing the authorities and traveling throughout the wilderness, Montag is extremely dirty and smelly, which is why Granger compares his scent to that of a wild bobcat.

Towards the end of the story, an atomic bomb is dropped on the dystopian city, and Bradbury uses a simile to describe the bomb's impact on the human population by writing,

The concussion knocked the air across and down the river, turned the men over like dominoes in a line, blew the water in lifting sprays.

Bradbury's simile compares the men falling and turning over to dominoes during the enormous blast.

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The preface ("In The Beginning"), to the novel Fahrenheit 451, offers an example of both personification and a simile:

A book landed, almost obediently, like a white pigeon, in his hands, wings fluttering.

Here, the book is personified by being given the ability (or an allusion to the ability) to be obedient. Given that personification is the giving of human qualities or characteristics to nonhuman and/or nonliving things, this obedience shown by the book is personification. At the same time, the book is likened to a pigeon. This comparison, given it includes the word "like," is an example of a simile.

Another example of a simile can be found later in the same paragraph.

In the dim, wavering light, a page hung open and it was like a snowy feather, the words delicately painted thereon.

Here, the page is compared to a feather.

In the next paragraph, another simile can be found. Here, a comparison is made between Montag's hand and a mouth.

And then Montag's hand closed like a mouth.

Another example of personification can be found towards the end of "In The Beginning."

His hand had done it all, his hand with a brain of its own, with a conscience and a curiosity in each trembling finger, had turned thief.


Here, the hand is given the ability to turn into a thief. hands cannot do this, only people can. 

Later, in part one (page three depending upon the copy used--this is found on the first page of the first chapter), a metaphor is found.

With the brass nozzle in his fists, with this great python spitting its venomous kerosene upon the world.

The metaphor is the comparison between the fire hose (or brass nozzle) to a python.

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