The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

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What are some examples of Twain's humor in Chapter 1 of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn?

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D. Reynolds eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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The main humor in chapter one arises from Huck's upside-down view of being "civilized." He finds middle-class life inferior to the much more marginal life he led with his father on the fringes of society.

For example, Huck doesn't like the new clothes the widow gives him to wear, finding them hot and restrictive. He prefers his comfortable old rags. He also doesn't enjoy having civilized dinners around a dining room table. He thinks the praying before eating is a waste of time, and he objects to having the different foods on his plate cooked by themselves, saying it is better to cook scraps of food all together in a barrel.

He doesn't see the point when the widow reads...

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