What are some examples of Twain's humor in Chapter 1 of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn?

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The main humor in chapter one arises from Huck's upside-down view of being "civilized." He finds middle-class life inferior to the much more marginal life he led with his father on the fringes of society.

For example, Huck doesn't like the new clothes the widow gives him to wear, finding...

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The main humor in chapter one arises from Huck's upside-down view of being "civilized." He finds middle-class life inferior to the much more marginal life he led with his father on the fringes of society.

For example, Huck doesn't like the new clothes the widow gives him to wear, finding them hot and restrictive. He prefers his comfortable old rags. He also doesn't enjoy having civilized dinners around a dining room table. He thinks the praying before eating is a waste of time, and he objects to having the different foods on his plate cooked by themselves, saying it is better to cook scraps of food all together in a barrel.

He doesn't see the point when the widow reads to him about Moses, because Moses is dead, and he doesn't care about dead people. He also doesn't enjoy book learning.

In short, the humor emerges from Huck's reaction to his situation being the opposite of what the reader would expect. Instead of feeling fortunate and grateful to have been "saved" from poverty and being able to live in a nice house with decent clothes, good food, and a chance for education, he feels he is in a worse position than he was when living in poverty.

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Huck's colloquial narrative delivery puts a smile on my face each time I read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Life is so miserable in the Widow Douglas's home that Huck wishes he were in hell--

... she told me all about the bad place, and I said I wished I was there.

Since the Widow is planning to go to Heaven, Huck decides he will avoid meeting her there; he will happily join his pal, Tom Sawyer, in the bad place. Huck's understanding and interpretation of the sounds he finds superstitious causes him to go through a series of movements to ward off their power. The sounds inside the house seem deafening to Huck and give him a sense of dread; he far prefers the dark outdoors and the less dangerous aspects they present. When he answers the cat's call with his own "Me-yow! Me-yow!", one wonders if he has gone 'round the bend until the reader discovers it is merely a signal from Tom.

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