To His Coy Mistress Questions and Answers
by Andrew Marvell

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To His Coy Mistress Literary Devices

What are some examples of literary terms in this poem?

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Here are some additional literary devices in this poem:

Repetition

As the speaker addresses this woman who has captivated him, he wants her to believe that she should be intimate with him—and now. He artfully conveys this sense of urgency through repetition in these lines:

Now therefore, while the youthful hue
Sits on thy skin like morning dew,
And while thy willing soul transpires
At every pore with instant fires,
Now let us sport us while we may,
And now, like amorous birds of prey,
This is a seductive man, and his intended lover is "coy," as noted in the title. He's pressing her to give in to his...

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In reading “To his Coy Mistress” there are three literary devices that jump out at me, rhyming words, parallel structure and  allusion.

The first device rhyming words links the first line to the second line, the third line to the fourth line and so on.

Marvell, in turn, uses this device as the basis for the next device, the poem’s parallel structure. First, every pair of lines is linked by a rhyme pair. Second, these pairs of rhyme follow each other as though they are in a single file line. Consequently, Marvell’s use of parallelism gives firm order to the first stanza.

The third literary device Marvell uses is allusion. This occurs in the middle of the first stanza: “Till the conversion of the Jews”. This line gets at the notion of the continual and long-lasting of the rejection of the Jesus as the Messiah.

 

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