Romeo and Juliet Questions and Answers
by William Shakespeare

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What are some examples of foreshadowing in Act I of Romeo and Juliet? 

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Act I of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet begins with a prologue which sets the scene and tells the audience what is to come. From the very beginning, the audience knows to expect feuding households and "star-crossed lovers." The ending of the play is also "spoiled" in the line, "Do with their death bury their parents' strife." There is never any doubt that the young lovers will die. This summary at the beginning of the play may be too direct to be considered proper foreshadowing, however, as that is generally more subtle.

Another possible example includes the Prince's warning to the Montagues and Capulets in Act I, Scene i. After breaking up their brawl, he speaks the lines:

Three civil brawls, bred of an airy word,

By thee, old Capulet, and Montague,

Have thrice disturb'd the quiet of our streets,

And made Verona's ancient citizens

Cast by their grave beseeming ornaments,

To wield old partisans, in hands as old,

Canker'd with peace, to part your canker'd hate:

If ever you disturb our streets again,

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