1984 Questions and Answers
by George Orwell

1984 book cover
Start Your Free Trial

What are some examples of foreshadowing in 1984?

Expert Answers info

Scott David eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2018

write1,095 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Law and Politics

1984 is a book that, from its earliest pages, creates an oppressive feeling in the mind of its reader. In answering this particular question, I'll be drawing on a few examples which can found in its first chapter, but which prove to be of critical importance much later in the book.

First, consider that when Orwell first discusses the Ministries, Winston notes:

The Ministry of Love was the really frightening one. There were no windows in it at all. Winston had never been inside the Ministry of Love, nor within half a kilometer of it. It was a place impossible to enter except on official business, and...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 710 words.)

Unlock This Answer Now


check Approved by eNotes Editorial

David Morrison eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2017

write10,786 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Law and Politics

check Approved by eNotes Editorial

booksnake eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2019

write443 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Science

check Approved by eNotes Editorial


acompanioninthetardis | Student

The old picture of St. Clement’s Church in the room that Winston rents above Mr. Charrington’s shop is another representation of the lost past. Winston associates a song with the picture that ends with the words “Here comes the chopper to chop off your head!” (167) This is an important foreshadow, as it is the telescreen hidden behind the picture that ultimately leads the Thought Police to Winston, symbolizing the Party’s corrupt control of the past.

parama9000 | Student

From the start, there is a foreshadowing of something unnatural or something wrong with the society depicted in the novel. "The clock struck thirteenth". In present-day, or in the past, the clock does not strike thirteen at one in the afternoon.

epollock | Student

1984 by George Orwell is such an extensive novel that to find examples of foreshadowing would have to depend on your definition or your teacher's definition of foreshadowing. And, depending on what edition you have, a great example of foreshadowing occurs around page 80, where Winston thinks that

“[i]n the end the Party would announce that two and two made five, and you would have to believe it.”

Before the end of his rehabilitation with O’Brien, Winston does accept this as truth. This is a great example of foreshadowing. Another is around page 140 when the repeated entrances of the rats foreshadow Winston’s trip into Room 101; Julia’s desire to clean behind the picture foreshadows the telescreen’s surreptitious existence behind that picture. This is another great example of foreshadowing.

check Approved by eNotes Editorial