What are some examples of consequence and choice in Sophocles's Antigone?

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David Morrison eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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Creon chooses to allow Polyneices' body to rot in the streets instead of having it buried according to the traditional religious rites. Polyneices was one of the so-called "Seven against Thebes," a group of men who spearheaded an Argive invasion of Thebes. As far as Creon's concerned, Polyneices is a traitor, and the treatment of his corpse must reflect this. Unfortunately for Creon, his choice has fatal consequences for himself and his family. His stubborn defiance of the gods and his inability to listen to reason or take Tiresias's prophecies seriously result in the tragic suicides of his...

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   In the play, "Antigone" the rules of the gods played an important role. This is reflected in the themes present in the play: choices and consequences. From the outset, Antigone's "choice" to bury Polyneices (her brother) seals her fate (consequence). Her refusal to obey Creon's law to leave her brother's body to be consumed by wild animals is in violation of his command.

  The consequence for her action leads to Creon's initial decision to have her put to death.  He later changes her fate and agree's to let her live.  Unfortunately, his decision arrives too late for Antigone.  She is a martyr in the play, and suffer's a tragic flaw.  This flaw is "pride".  This "pride" leads to her own downfall.    Antigone sacrifices her own life for personal freedom.  She decides to commit suicide rather than allow Creon to decide her fate.

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