What are some examples of connotation in Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury?

Expert Answers info

booboosmoosh eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2003

write4,119 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Social Sciences

Connotation is defined as follows:

Suggestions and associations which surround a word as opposed to its bare, literal meaning. 

Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451 uses connotations masterfully, providing insight that goes beyond what is printed on paper.

In "The Hearth and the Salamander" section of the novel, Montag experiences an assault on his senses that comes from the full-length wall TVs.

 A great thunderstorm of sound gushed from the walls. Music bombarded him at such an immense volume that his bones were almost shaken from their tendons; he felt his jaw vibrate, his eyes wobble in his head. . . .

The thunder faded. The music died. . . .

It was indeed remarkable. Something had happened.

Thunderstorms are literally enormous, earth-shaking events in nature. In this case, the thunder is not only used...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 397 words.)

Unlock This Answer Now


Further Reading:

check Approved by eNotes Editorial

accessteacher eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2009

write13,728 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, Social Sciences, and History

check Approved by eNotes Editorial