What are some of the differences between Ponyboy and Darry?

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cldbentley's profile pic

cldbentley | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

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There are many differences between Ponyboy and Darry Curtis.  First of all, their looks are much different.  Ponyboy is much smaller than Darry, who is "six-feet-two, and broad-shouldered and muscular."  Ponyboy also has "light-brown, almost-red hair and greenish-gray eyes," while Darry has dark brown hair and "eyes that are like two pieces of pale blue-green ice." 

Darry is a much more logical thinker than Ponyboy.  Ponyboy is artistic and admits that he doesn't use his head as he should.  Darry "doesn't understand anything that is not plain hard fact." 

Darry, who was also athletic and popular (despite social factors), gave up his scholarship when his parents died. 

And now he didn't have time between jobs to even think about college.  So he never went anywhere and never did anything anymore, except work out at gyms and go skiing with some old friends of his sometimes.

Because of the sacrifices he has made, Darry is hard on Ponyboy and pushes him to excel at his studies.  Darry knows that Ponyboy has the intellect to succeed, while he had only physical skill.

The struggles of losing his parents and being responsible for his two younger brothers made Darry harder in many ways.  The challenges of being raised by his brothers and also losing his parents made Ponyboy softer (more artistic, more "feeling").

user5887722's profile pic

user5887722 | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

What are 5 important quotes to show characterization - similarities and differences - between Pony and Darry?  With page #'s

ik9744's profile pic

ik9744 | Student, Grade 9 | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted on

Darry loves to look tough and fight, while Ponyboy hates fighting and loves his hair. Darry is more caring then Ponyboy because he gave up a lot of his career in the future for Pony but Pony seems to not realize at first, but towards the end he starts to develop the thinking. 

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