What are some differences between Medea by Euripides and Medea by Seneca? 

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The Medea of Euripides lacks the keen focus of pure vengeance that Seneca portrays in his version of her. Of course, Euripides must eventually get around to the theme of vengeance and the fury of a woman scorned—this is, after all, one of the main themes of Medea's mythology. But whereas the Euripides version has her enter the play bemoaning the fate of women, who must rely on the moral rectitude of their husbands in order to achieve happiness, the Medea of Seneca wastes no time at all, opening the play with a clear, haunting statement of her white-hot rage and desire for vengeance. The Euripides Medea is also a bit more calculating than Seneca's version—she makes clear plans to escape to Athens when she secures an oath from Aegeus to give her sanctuary in the future. Seneca's Medea, on the other hand, does not seem to have any future plans beyond the taking of vengeance, and she only escapes due to a deus ex machina —the appearance of a serpent-borne chariot, which bears her away to...

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