What are some social themes in "Shooting An Elephant" by George Orwell?

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There are a number of social themes in "Shooting An Elephant." According to the reference link provided, a culture clash is one such theme, reinforced through Orwell 's unwillingness to shoot the elephant and contrasted with the attitude of the Burmese, who feel the opposite. For them, shooting the elephant...

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There are a number of social themes in "Shooting An Elephant." According to the reference link provided, a culture clash is one such theme, reinforced through Orwell's unwillingness to shoot the elephant and contrasted with the attitude of the Burmese, who feel the opposite. For them, shooting the elephant provides a spectacle and an opportunity for meat. Orwell, in contrast, reluctantly shoots the elephant to save face:

A sahib has got to act like a sahib; he has got to appear resolute, to know his own mind and do definite things.

Racism is another social theme in the story. We see this most clearly in the language used by the English to describe the native Burmese population. The phrase, "damn Coringhee coolie," is one such example, as is the idea that the life of an elephant is worth more than a "coolie," a belief expressed in the aftermath of the shooting.

Finally, the theme of hostility is also present throughout Orwell's story. This is most apparent in the opening paragraph, when Orwell describes his experiences of the local population, especially the Burmese priests. As an object of local hatred, Orwell bears the brunt of their resentment towards the English

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