What are six uses of hyperbole describing Jim Smiley in Twain's "The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County"?

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Here are six more instances of hyperbole to describe Jim Smiley:

If there was a horse-race, you'd find him flush, or you'd find him busted at the end of it; if there was a dog-fight, he'd bet on it; if there was a cat-fight, he'd bet on it; if there was a chicken-fight, he'd bet on it; why, if there was two birds setting on a fence, he would bet you which one would fly first; or if there was a camp-meeting, he would be there reg'lar, to bet on Parson Walker, which he judged to be the best exhorter about here, and so he was, too, and a good man. If he even seen a straddle-bug start to go anywheres, he would bet you how long it would take him to get wherever he was going to, and if you took him up, he would foller that straddle-bug to Mexico but what he would find out where he was bound for and how long he was on the road.

There are several exaggerations in the above quote, but the emphasis here is what others have mentioned, that Smiley would bet on anything: a horse race, a dog fight, a...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 1261 words.)

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