What quotes in Shakespeare's Othello portray Iago's betrayal of Othello?

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Iago is depicted as the ultimate villain, carefully planning and executing an impressive plot to get revenge on Othello . He seeks revenge because Othello did not promote him to the revered position of lieutenant and gave the title to the inexperienced Michael Cassio. Iago also suspects that Othello has...

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Iago is depicted as the ultimate villain, carefully planning and executing an impressive plot to get revenge on Othello. He seeks revenge because Othello did not promote him to the revered position of lieutenant and gave the title to the inexperienced Michael Cassio. Iago also suspects that Othello has slept with his wife and proceeds to manipulate several characters in order to get revenge. Despite Iago's malevolent intentions, Othello completely trusts him and believes that he is a benevolent, loyal subject.

Iago's betrayal is poignantly depicted in act three, scene three, when he initially begins to plant the seeds of jealousy and suspicion into Othello's head. When Othello witnesses Cassio run away after speaking with Desdemona, Iago insinuates that Desdemona and Cassio are engaged in an affair and warns Othello about the dangers of jealousy. Iago proceeds to say,

I speak not yet of proof.
Look to your wife, observe her well with Cassio.
Wear your eyes thus, not jealous nor secure.
I would not have your free and noble nature
Out of self-bounty be abused. Look to ’t.
I know our country disposition well.
In Venice they do let God see the pranks
They dare not show their husbands.
Their best conscience
Is not to leave ’t undone, but keep’t unknown. (3.3.201-209)

Iago continues to betray Othello by painting Desdemona in a negative light and reminding him of how she cleverly deceived her father. Iago's portrayal of Desdemona raises concerns about her honesty, and Othello begins to entertain the idea of his wife's infidelity. Iago continues to play on Othello's insecurities by saying,

Ay, there’s the point. As, to be bold with you,
Not to affect many proposèd matches
Of her own clime, complexion, and degree,
Whereto we see in all things nature tends—
Foh! One may smell in such a will most rank,
Foul disproportions, thoughts unnatural.
But—pardon me—I do not in position
Distinctly speak of her, though I may fear
Her will, recoiling to her better judgment,
May fall to match you with her country forms,
And happily repent. (3.3.234-244)

Once Othello begins to doubt Desdemona's faithfulness, Iago leaves him with his tortured thoughts and receives Desdemona's handkerchief from Emilia. Iago proceeds to elaborate on the rest of his plan during an aside by saying,

I will in Cassio’s lodging lose this napkin
And let him find it. Trifles light as air
Are to the jealous confirmations strong
As proofs of holy writ. This may do something.
The Moor already changes with my poison. (3.3.331-335)

Overall, Iago's betrayal of Othello is depicted in act three, scene three, when he insinuates that Desdemona is having an affair with Cassio and manipulates Othello's insecurities. Othello becomes tainted by Iago's suggestions and becomes suspicious of his wife.

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A particular quotation from act 1, scene 3 is a great example of Iago's treachery:

Thus do I ever make my fool my purse,
For I mine own gained knowledge should profane
If I would time expend with such a snipe
But for my sport and profit.

Iago has just sent the hapless Roderigo off to sell his land. He told the foolish young man that he needed to do this in order to raise enough money to woo Desdemona, with whom Roderigo is head over heels in love. But in actual fact, the wicked, scheming Iago intends to cheat Roderigo out of his money. This is what he means when he says that he has made a fool his own purse.

It's at this point in the play that we realize just how wicked Iago really is. He will stop at nothing to get his own way, even if it means stealing from those ostensibly on the same side as himself. Iago is a user, a master manipulator with the ability to get other people to do his own bidding. And all the while they never know they're being duped until it's too late.

So will I turn her virtue into pitch
And out of her own goodness make the net
That shall enmesh them all.

These lines come from act 2, scene 3. Here, Iago is referring to his dastardly scheme to destroy Desdemona. He's going to trash her reputation, turning her virtue into pitch, which is a kind of black, sticky substance. He then mixes his metaphors by saying that he will make a net out her goodness that will trap everyone else he wants to destroy. Iago cleverly realizes that by destroying Desdemona's reputation for virtue, he'll also destroy his enemies with one fell swoop.

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Iago's betrayal is a central theme in Shakespeare's Othello, and, therefore, the play is full of lines portraying his betrayal. While we are limited to space, below are a few ideas of types of quotes to look for that help prove and demonstrate his betrayal.

One good type of quote to look for is anything relaying the reasons for his betrayal. Iago betrays Othello out of jealousy because Othello chose not to promote him to lieutenant, despite his merit, but instead chose another officer. Therefore, any quote explaining what Iago perceives as Othello's offense will help prove that Iago betrayed Othello by showing us the reasons why. For example, in his first speech, Iago argues that he knows he would be valuable as a lieutenant and should have been chosen:

I know my price, I am worth no worse a place.
But he, as loving his own pride and purposes
Evades them with a bombast circumstance
...
And, in conclusion, ... says he,
"I have already chosen my officer." (I.i.11-17)

The second type of quote would be any quote discussing Iago's plans for betrayal. In Act II, Iago observes Desdemona and Cassio flirting and concocts his plan to make Othello jealous. Not only that, he believes that Othello has slept with his own wife and therefore wants to avenge himself, not just for failing to promoting him to lieutenant but also for sleeping with Iago's wife, as we see him state:

And nothing can or shall content my soul
Till I am even'd with him, wife for wife;
Or failing so,, yet that I put the Moor
At least into a jealousy so strong
That judgement cannot cure. (II.i.306-310)

All of these types of lines will help convey and prove Iago's betrayal of Othello.  

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