What are the similiarities and differences between Doodle and the ibis in "The Scarlet Ibis"?

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I think a good a place to start comparing and contrasting the scarlet ibis and Doodle is their physical abilities. Both Doodle and the scarlet ibis are physically limited. We are told that the family sees that something just isn't quite right about how the bird is moving in the...

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I think a good a place to start comparing and contrasting the scarlet ibis and Doodle is their physical abilities. Both Doodle and the scarlet ibis are physically limited. We are told that the family sees that something just isn't quite right about how the bird is moving in the tree.

At that moment the bird began to flutter, but the wings were uncoordinated, and amid much flapping and a spray of flying feathers . . .

The bird appears to be uncoordinated in its movements, and the description of its movements and death is quite sad. Soon after, Doodle attempts to bury the bird, and his movements are also described as awkward.

Now we were watching him through the front window, but he didn't know it. His awkwardness at digging the hole with a shovel whose handle was twice as long as he was made us laugh . . .

Doodle and the bird might be comparable in how their movements are limited and awkward; however, a difference also exists in those movements. The scarlet ibis is awkward in its movements because it is injured. The bird has likely been injured in the storm that brought it to Doodle's house. On the other hand, Doodle's limitations are not caused by an injury that he received. Doodle's awkwardness and physical limitations are a result of genetics. He was born the way that he is, and he is able to do much of what he can do because of Brother's hard work.

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Doodle and the scarlet ibis are both out of their elements: Doodle, who has a bad heart and mental limitations, is being forced by his brother to do the things that healthy children do in order to make him seem more normal. The ibis, too, is out-of-place on the family property: The bird has been lost in a storm and is hundreds of miles from its normal, tropical setting. They are both endangered species, and Doodle recognizes that the weakened, sick bird is not unlike himself. He is immediately attracted to the winged bird, which Doodle probably associates with angels. Later, the bird's color will also come to symbolize the bloodied Doodle's body. Meanwhile, the beautiful bird dies in the presence of its admirers, and Doodle buries it with ceremony; his own death comes alone--muddied, bloodied and rain-soaked--left behind by his older brother at a time when he most needs him.

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