What is the signifigance and idea of religion in 1984? I have to use quotations from the novel to support this.  

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The Party in 1984 is hostile to religion for the same reason that it dislikes sex, romantic love, filial affection, and all other strong interests and feelings not directly related to the Party. One should love Big Brother and hate Goldstein. Love of God and hatred of sin would interfere with these duties. As one would expect of a totalitarian regime, the Party takes this attitude very far. When Winston is imprisoned in the Ministry of Love, he meets Ampleforth, the poet, who has been incarcerated for allowing the word "God" to remain in an edition of Kipling he was editing. Ampleforth clearly...

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I think it has everything to do with the novel. Below is an excerpt from my essay (link to full article at the bottom):

I willingly admit that on the surface, Orwell wrote 1984 as a political thriller about a dystopian society ruled by an oligarchical dictatorship and what that might actually look like in the very near future (a mere 35 years from its original publication). Behind the veneer, I trust that Orwell wrote 1984 with the purpose of warning the world, especially the West, of the inherent dangers of totalitarianism, the absolute necessity of clarity in language, and to advocate for democratic socialism. On a much deeper level, I fantasize that Orwell was describing, in great detail, what life might actually be like if God were absent and instead, Satan was in control of the people. It is this very concept in which I wish to elaborate.

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