How does Charlotte Bronte use irony when depicting the relationship between Rochester and Jane in Chapter 23 of Jane Eyre? How does the use of these forms of irony increase the tension in this chapter?

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In Charlotte' Brontë's Jane Eyre, the significant event that occurs in Chapter 23 is that Edward Rochester declares his love for Jane and asks her to marry him, even though they are from completely different social circles. He is a wealthy landowner and Jane is a penniless governess, something slightly better than a servant, but still dismissed as unimportant by the upper-class. Rochester's declaration is a complete surprise to Jane, though she deeply loves him.

Verbal irony is an ironic statement, and is...

...often used for emphasis in the assertion of a truth.

Dramatic irony occurs when an author...

...causes a character to speak or act erroneously, out of ignorance of some portion of the truth.

There is verbal irony when Rochester speaks of Jane having to leave: the truth he seems to be sharing is that she will have to take a new position in someone else's household, however (and here is where I find the statement ironic), Jane will be asked to make a move—away from what she knows—to something she...

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