The Mysterious Stranger by Mark Twain

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What significant character traits does Satan (in Mark Twain's The Mysterious Stranger) and Major Barbara (in George Bernard Shaw's Major Barbara) have in common, and what significant traits they do they...

What significant character traits does Satan (in Mark Twain's The Mysterious Stranger) and Major Barbara (in George Bernard Shaw's Major Barbara) have in common, and what significant traits they do they not have in common?

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A more appropriate parallel than Satan in Mark Twain’s The Mysterious Stranger and Barbara Undershaft in George Bernard Shaw’s Major Barbara would be Satan and Andrew Undershaft, patriarch of the clan and owner of the armaments factory that sustains the town in which the play is set.  The irony of Shaw’s play lies in the enormous financial good Undershaft can do for the town’s poor relative to that of his daughter, Barbara, who works at the local Salvation Army shelter, where she carries the rank of major.  Early in Major Barbara, Lady Britomart is lecturing her son, Stephen, regarding the ambivalent moral state in which her son’s father exists:

“You know, Stephen, it’s perfectly scandalous.  Those two men, Andrew Undershaft and Lazarus (note the Biblical reference, as well as the use of the name “Barbara” for the main protagonist , Saint Barbara being the patron saint of artillerymen, alongside Andrew Undershaft’s profession), positively have Europe under their thumbs. ...

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