Describe the point of view in Chapter 5 of Night?

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litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Although Wiesel does use the first person, it is a distant first person.  He rarely comments on how he felt on a deep level.  He reports what he sees.

One of the times Wiesel does share his feelings is when he shares what he said to God during the Rosh Hashanah celebration in the concentration camp.

But look at these men whom You have betrayed, allowing them to be tortured, slaughtered, gassed, and burned, what do they do? They pray before You! They praise Your name! (ch 5)

This is a deeply personal reaction to the irony of religious celebrations occurring in a place that seems forsaken by God.  Wisel feels disconnected, because he feels like he has lost a big part of him.  Religion, and God, were most important to him than to most people, including most boys his age.  He felt deeply betrayed, and this resulted in the change in point of view, allowing us to get closer to the narrator.

 

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