In 1984what is the significance of Winston's dreams about O'Brien and his sister and mother? Chapters 2 and 3.  His dream of O'Brien (shall meet in a place where there is no darkness), and his dreams...

In 1984 what is the significance of Winston's dreams about O'Brien and his sister and mother?

Chapters 2 and 3.  His dream of O'Brien (shall meet in a place where there is no darkness), and his dreams of his sister and mother disappearing.  Deconstruct each one:  what are the underpinnings of these dreams?  What are their deeper meanings?

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Kelvin Brakus eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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In Part One, Chapter Two, Winston talks about a dream he had in which he met with O'Brien in a dark room. Symbolically, this dream is an expression of Winston's desire to rebel against the Party. By imagining this connection with O'Brien, the dream provides Winston with an impetus for rebellion, convincing him that if he rebels, he will find like-minded individuals who can support him.

On a more practical level, this dream also foreshadows Winston's meeting with O'Brien in which he becomes a member of the Brotherhood, as well as his eventual torture by O'Brien in the Ministry of Love.

In the next chapter, Winston dreams about his mother sacrificing her life so that he might live. This dream is significant because it symbolizes Winston's desire to return to an older way of life in which people have personal loyalties and close connections to those around them, not only to the Party.

Finally, the dream about the girl with dark hair is not only symbolic of Winston's sexual oppression but also...

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