Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë

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What is the significance of the title, Wuthering Heights?

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Brontë named her novel Wuthering Heights because the place Wuthering Heights, manor and farm, is the nucleus of the story. The word wuthering itself describes the harsh, rugged weather of the area.

The rough environment of Wuthering Heights, an old stone manor house dating from the sixteenth century, breeds the tough, deep, entangled roots that bind Catherine and Heathcliff to each other and the moors. They are raised on harshness, neglect, and abuse, and grow up strong, even brutal. They—and their rocky, unembellished home furnished with rough wooden settles and pewter dishware—are explicitly contrasted to the delicate, spoiled Lintons and their prettified Thrushcross Grange, with its white plaster walls, crystal chandeliers, and plush, upholstered furniture.

The weak, delicate environment that breeds the Lintons leaves them unprepared for facing Catherine and Heathcliff. Isabella, especially, has been deluded by romantic fantasies formed by privilege to believe that Heathcliff loves...

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