What is the significance of this passage from Hamlet? O that this too too solid flesh would melt, Thaw and resolve itself into a dew, Or that the Everlasting had not fixed His canon 'gainst...

What is the significance of this passage from Hamlet?

O that this too too solid flesh would melt,
Thaw and resolve itself into a dew,
Or that the Everlasting had not fixed
His canon 'gainst self-slaughter! O God, O God,How weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable
Seem to me all the uses of this world!

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Kristen Lentz eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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In Act I, scene two, Hamlet has his first soliloquy on the occasion of hearing that his mother has married his Uncle ClaudiusHamlet is furious and wounded at the same time by her actions and haste in marriage. 

He opens his soliloquy with lines which reveal his angst and desperation:

O, that this too too sullied flesh would melt,
Thaw and resolve itself into...

(The entire section contains 188 words.)

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