What is the significance of Grass in Walt Whitman's Song of myself?

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The significance of Grass, in American poet Walt Whitman’s “Song of Myself”, as part of his epic work “Leaves of Grass” is that a single blade of grass represents an individual in society. The man in the poem is “…observing a spear of summer grass.” This causes him to ponder the human condition and the thoughts and actions of human beings. This blade or spear of grass is amongst an innumerable host of leaves of grass. It is a representation of this grass, as well as distinct and separate (as an individual blade) from this multitude.

This is the same with people. We are all part of the human family. We are also distinct, unique individuals of this group. When the man ponders the blade of grass he is thinking about man (exemplified by the blade) and his purpose on the earth.

Right off the bat, in this section of “Leaves of Grass”, Whitman alludes to the fact that we come from the dust of the earth. Spears of grass arise from the dirt. Man is created of the dust of the...

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