What is the significance of the glass of milk, apple, and pear in the third section?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

Actually, this is one of those nice instances in which the author pretty much spells out what he means. By that I mean, Bradbury has Montag long that the world gives him some sign that it approves of him, that it accepts him. The milk, apple, and pear would be...

Unlock
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Start your 48-Hour Free Trial

Actually, this is one of those nice instances in which the author pretty much spells out what he means. By that I mean, Bradbury has Montag long that the world gives him some sign that it approves of him, that it accepts him. The milk, apple, and pear would be those things. They are quiet and domestic, which are two things this new world (and Montag's life) are not, and they would be signs of the world approving of him.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team