What is the significance of the final passage in "Araby" by James Joyce?

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Joyce is famous for ending his short stories with an epiphany, which is a sudden insight or revelation. The word epiphany is a reference to the Wise Men coming to see the infant Jesus and having the sudden insight that he was the messiah or savior of Israel.

In "Araby," the young narrator has dreamed of Mangan's sister, on whom he has a crush, and of the bazaar, Araby. The two conflate, or come together in his mind, especially as he has promised Mangan's sister a gift from the bazaar if he goes. Both the bazaar and the girl represent to him his aspirations of finding a better, more beautiful, more exotic life than the one he leads. His life is characterized by being dull and brown, lived at the end of a blind alley or cut-de-sac, hemmed in by an alcoholic uncle and the restraints of school.

Instead, when he gets to Araby just as it is closing, he realizes he has been deluding himself. The bazaar, dusty and junky, with booths manned by ordinary Dubliners , is nothing like the enchanting...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 580 words.)

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