What is the significance of the fight between Tom and Amada in SC.3? How does it reveal Tom`s personal goal?I'm going to opium dens ! Yes, opium dens, dens of vice and criminals' hang-outs, Mother....

What is the significance of the fight between Tom and Amada in SC.3? How does it reveal Tom`s personal goal?

I'm going to opium dens ! Yes, opium dens, dens of vice and criminals' hang-outs, Mother. I've joined the Hogan gang, I'm a hired assassin, I carry a tommy-gun in a violin case! I run a string of cat-houses in the Valley! They call me Killer, Killer Wingfield, I'm leading a double-life, a simple, honest warehouse worker by day, by night a dynamic tsar of the underworld, Mother. I go to gambling casinos, I spin away fortunes on the roulette table ! I wear a patch over one eye and a false moustache, sometimes I put on green whiskers. On those occasions they call me -El Diablo ! Oh, I could tell you things to make you sleepless ! My enemies plan to dynamite this place. They're going to blow us all sky-high some night ! I'll be glad, very happy, and so will you ! You'll go up, up on a broomstick, over Blue Mountain with seventeen gentlemen callers! You ugly - babbling old - witch.

Asked on by kelvin1218

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Cruelty among family members is a prevalent motif of Tennessee Williams, and Tom and Amanda of The Glass Menagerie are each cruel to the other.  Tom's acrimonious words and insults are his retaliation against his domineering mother with whom he feels trapped in a life of desperation, while her scoldings express her fears that Tom may lose his job and, thus, place the entire family in a penurious position. 

True to the theme of truth disguised as illusion, Tom exaggerates his nighttime activities, declaring himself a mobster and drug addict.  Yet, hidden in these illusive descriptions are the "slow and implacable furies of desperation" that in insulting his mother, his words express Tom's fear that he will be like his father and escape the burdens of familial responsiblity.

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