What is the significance of the ending of The Kite Runner?

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The ending of The Kite Runner shows Amir running a kite for Sorhab, his former best friend Hassam's son, whom he has adopted. The heartbreaking story has come all the way around, because Amir and Hassam would always fly kites together, and Hassam would run the kite for Amir, showing...

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The ending of The Kite Runner shows Amir running a kite for Sorhab, his former best friend Hassam's son, whom he has adopted. The heartbreaking story has come all the way around, because Amir and Hassam would always fly kites together, and Hassam would run the kite for Amir, showing his devotion and love for Amir. He would always respond "for you a thousand times over" when Amir would ask him to return the kite to him or to run it.

Now, having forgiven himself for the pain he allowed Hassam to feel and having visited him and helped save Sohrab, he shows the same devotion to Hassam and Sohrab. Amir adopted Sohrab and brought him to America to give him a good life. Now, running kites, when Sohrab asks Amir to run it, his response is the same as his old friend's was.

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In the winter of 1975 Hassam and Amir won the kite tournament in Kabul.  This was the closest they would ever be and just a few minutes later they would begin to be torn apart by the violence of Assef against Hassam. When Amir wins the tournament, Hassam tells him that he will run the kite for him.  Amir tells him to bring the kite back to him.  Hassan, "cupped his hands around his mouth and yelled, " For you, a thousand times over."  Now years later and thousands of miles away in California Amir cuts a kite and turns to Sohrab, Hassan's son, and asks,

"Do you want me to run that kite for you?"  I thought I saw hin nod. "For you a thousand times over, " I heard myself say.  Then I turned and ran. 

This scene is significant because Amir's life has now come full circle.  He is now running the kite, not just for Sohrab, but for Hassam, and for himself and the history that they shared.

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