The Way to Rainy Mountain Questions and Answers
by N. Scott Momaday

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In "The Way to Rainy Mountain," what significance does Momaday's grandmother have for him, and what does she represent?

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The Way to Rainy Mountain is centered around Momaday's memories of his grandmother Aho, his reactions to her death, and his memories of her. It is clear that Aho was not only personally important to Momaday but also was crucial in her ability to carry on oral traditions. Given her age, she had firs hand experience of cultural traditions, such as the Kiowa Sun Dance, that Momaday was unable to experience firsthand, in addition to experiences of the oppression that led to the end of the Kiowa Sun Dance.

It is clear that Aho was deeply connected to Kiowa practices that had been stamped out by the time Momaday came of age. This allows her to be a link to Momaday's heritage, and it is clear that Momaday recognizes the significance of this, and it is part of what makes mourning her so important to him.

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The Way to Rainy Mountain is a book by Native American author N. Scott Momaday that reflects on his Kiowa heritage. Momaday’s grandmother, Aho, is a key link between Momaday and that heritage,...

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aggie90 | Student
  • Momaday puts together pieces of mythology, history and his grandmother Aho's stories to reveal the story of Kiowa people. Momaday's learns from his grandmother's stories:
  • The Kiowa people emerged into this world via a hollow log. They then settled near Rainy Mountain in Oklahoma.
  • At one point in time, the Kiowa people were warriors and horsemen
  • that relied on hunting as opposed to agriculture. This tribe later died out due to a series of disasters. Given that, Momaday wrote this book especially to preserve the history of his people.
  • Since Momaday's grandmother, Aho witnessed the last kiowaSun Dance in 1887, Momaday had to weave her stories in the book as one that saw the sunset of the Kiowa people.
  • She represents a historian that was present at the time the Kiowa tribe decimated.