What is the significance of Amir's visit to Farid's family? Why did he give them money?

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mkcapen1 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Valedictorian

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In the book "The Kite Runner" Farid has risk his own safety by going into a dangerous zone with Amir. He even waits for him risking his life to help him.  He is a good man who has two wives and five children.  He had lost two toes and three fingers due to a land mine blast that had killed two of his daughters. Farid had helped to prepare Amir for the journey and dangers involved and instructed him on how to act.  He tells him always to keep his eyes on his feet whenever Talibs are around.  Farid is also the voice of the changes that have occurred in Amir's homeland.  He generates this information as he transports Amir around the places.

Initially there was a division between Farid and Amir.  When the journey to rescue Hassan's son began they did not talk.  Farid had resentment against Amir until he learned that Amir was not in Afghanistan to just sell his father's property and return to America.  He learned that he was there to rescue his illegitimate half brother’s son, a Hazara.  His mood and relationship changed from that point on.

The significance of the family visit was that it enabled Farid to have a better understanding of Amir and it also serves to remind Amir of the importance of his life in Afghanistan.  It is during his visit that it is suggested that he write about his homeland.

Farid had become a good friend to Amir in a short time.  He had risked everything he had and only to help him with little expectations in return.  Amir has no real way that he could ever pay him back for the risks he has taken.  He is aware that having money will enable him to do more for his children.  He gives him $2,000 dollars.  It is also a symbol for the idea that Amir had only come to gain money when he arrived in Afghanistan.  Instead, Amir has given it away.

 

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