What is the significance of the alliusion to Plato in Fahrenheit 451? Referring to what Faber said on pg. 76, "How many copies of Shakespeare and Plato?" What about this allusion relates to events/characters/themes in the novel? Why did Ray Bradbury choose this particular allusion?  

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Plato is famous for his Allegory of the Cave. In the Allegory of the Cave, prisoners are chained to a wall. They can not look directly at reality. Instead, they can only gaze at the blank wall of the cave that is across from them. Shadows of reality from outside the cave flicker across this wall. The people in the cave mistake these shadows for reality itself.

The people of Montag's dystopian society are like the prisoners in Plato's cave. Because they are not allowed books—i.e., access to reality—all they can do is stare at the figures on their view screens. They mistake these shallow figures for reality itself.

The prime character who is akin to one of Plato's prisoners is Mildred. She simply is afraid to liberate herself from the cave of her life, even though it is so empty she at one point attempts suicide.

At the end of the book, in contrast, Montag frees himself from the cave of his society and becomes what Plato would call a philosopher, looking at reality squarely. As if to...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 549 words.)

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