The Veldt Questions and Answers
by Ray Bradbury

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What sensory details are used to emphasize sight, sound, taste, smell, and touch in "The Veldt"?

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"The Veldt" is a story about a family living in a technologically advanced world in which the children "don’t want to do anything but look and listen and smell," because, as Peter asks, "what else is there to do?” Bradbury uses sensory images to bring the vividness of the nursery into incredibly stark contrast with the mechanized, mindless reality that is the rest of the house; and, as the nursery represents the inner psychological workings of the children, it has quite a bit to bear on their spoiled nature and the way they value the illusion of reality over reality itself.

Most of the sensory details are, therefore, used to describe the African veldt in the nursery. George feels "that sun . . . on his neck, still, like a hot paw." He remembers "the smell of blood." The "odor" of the lions, their roars, and the screams of the parents permeate the entire story.

One of the most descriptive passages is the following, when the lions first begin to run at George and Lydia:

feel the...

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