In what sense are the Fool's assertions true or false in act III, scene 2, of King Lear?

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In King Lear, the Fool is often wiser than the king. The Fool points this out in act I when he threatens the king's displeasure by implying that Lear is a bigger fool than he is for giving away his kingdom and spurning his youngest daughter.
In act III, the Fool's assertions are true in a commonsensical way. He would like Lear to get out of the raging storm and tells him so, saying it would be better to ask his daughters to let him in, even if it means swallowing his pride, than to stay out in a merciless downpour. The violent weather, however, expresses Lear's fury and grief, and comforts him on a psychic level.
Later in the scene, the Fool sings a song:
He that has and a little tiny wit—
With...

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