From Confessions, what is the "self" according to Augustine?

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Augustine's sense of self is his relation to God, both in his recognition of God's love and his response to it—achieved through self-presentation, then self-realization. Augustine believed one could not achieve inner peace without finding God's love.

 


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A striking thing about Augustine's Confessions is how relevant it is to many aspects of modern or contemporary thought, and the view of the self is one of these.

One current theoretical and research perspective on personal identity is known as "narrative identity," which Adams & McLean define as

a person’s internalized and evolving life story, integrating the reconstructed past and imagined future to provide life with some degree of unity and purpose.

The narrative identity begins to be formed in childhood, where it is deeply impacted by the parents, and grows from there:

Researchers have tracked the development of narrative identity from its origins in conversations between parents and their young children to the articulation of...

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