What is a salt?  When you are doing a neutralization reaction, which is: acid+base ---> salt+water What is salt, does it literally mean salt or something esle, and I want to know what that...

What is a salt?

 

When you are doing a neutralization reaction, which is:

acid+base ---> salt+water

What is salt, does it literally mean salt or something esle, and I want to know what that something else is.

And I would really appreciate some examples too.

thank you

 

Asked on by ugot

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bandmanjoe's profile pic

bandmanjoe | Middle School Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

Posted on

Chemically speaking, when you combine an acid with a base, you get, as you stated, a salt plus the formation of water.  A great example of that would be hydrochloric acid (a strong acid) with sodium hydroxide (a strong base):

HCl + NaOH ---> NaCl + HOH, or H2O

The addition of hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide will produce sodium chloride, which is the table salt people put on their food, and water.  Sodium choride is composed of the two ions sodium+ and chlorine-, two elements people need in their bodies daily in small quantities.  The salty taste salt produces is one of the basic tasting qualities humans possess.

Going further, on the periodic table, the combination of a metal (any of the elements on the left side of the table, particularly the far left) and a nonmetal from group 17, the halogens, will form a salt of some sort.  The word halogen means "Salt former".  A good example here would be the addition of potassium and bromine:

K + Br ---> KBr

The addition of potassium and bromine gives the production of potassium bromide, a salt.

Sources:

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