What's the meaning of "true paradise" in "Twicknam Garden"?

The meaning of “true paradise” in “Twicknam Garden” is that the speaker has turned the eponymous garden into Eden by bringing with him the “serpent” of his emotional pain. This is an allusion to the Book of Genesis, where Satan corrupts Adam and Eve by disguising himself as a serpent and encouraging them to eat the forbidden fruit.

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The lovesick speaker of “Twicknam Garden” has repaired to a truly lovely part of the world in order to get over a broken heart. He enters the eponymous garden in the hope that the joys and beauties of nature will somehow soothe his emotional pain.

But his hopes...

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The lovesick speaker of “Twicknam Garden” has repaired to a truly lovely part of the world in order to get over a broken heart. He enters the eponymous garden in the hope that the joys and beauties of nature will somehow soothe his emotional pain.

But his hopes are all in vain, for it soon becomes blindingly obvious to the speaker that he can't get over his beloved and so cannot enjoy any quiet or repose, even in the midst of this lush and beautiful garden. Why, the very trees seem to laugh at him and mock him to his face. In a fit of pique, the speaker expresses his dearest wish that the garden should be enfolded in wintry darkness.

As it happens, he's doing a pretty good job of making the garden miserable all on his own. By bringing all his emotional pain with him into the garden, he's turned it into a “true paradise.” On the face of it, this sounds perfectly fine. After all, paradise is supposed to be a place of joy and beauty, where everything is absolutely perfect. But the speaker is being ironic here. When he talks about a “true paradise,” he's making an allusion to the Garden of Eden after Satan, disguised as a serpent, corrupted Adam and Eve by getting them to eat the forbidden fruit of the Tree of Knowledge.

In the case of the speaker, his emotional pain is the “serpent” he's brought with him into the garden, and which has turned what should be a lovely, peaceful spot into the kind of “True paradise” left behind by Satan after he'd successfully corrupted Adam and Eve and introduced sin and death into the world.

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