What roles do Steve's parents play in his life before, during, and after the trial? What characterizes his relationship with his parents? What responsibility do they have for him getting in trouble...

What roles do Steve's parents play in his life before, during, and after the trial? What characterizes his relationship with his parents? What responsibility do they have for him getting in trouble (if any), and what are the ways in which they tried to help him get out of trouble?

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gmuss25 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Steve's parents are both supportive throughout the novel. Myers does not go into great detail about Steve's relationship with his parents before the trial, but their support during the trial suggests that they are close and care about their son. They regularly visit Steve while he is in jail, and Steve's mother attempts to comfort him. Steve's father supports him but cannot come to terms with his son's situation. Steve's father mentions that he imagined his son attending Morehouse and playing football. After the trial, Steve's father moves away and distances himself from Steve and his family. Steve's mother is simply happy that he is not guilty. Steve shares a close relationship with his parents, and it is apparent that they both care deeply about their son. They even suggest getting an African American lawyer to defend him because they think it will help. Although Steve made the decision to participate in the crime, his parents clearly haven't instilled a sense of right and wrong in their child. Steve's flashback to when he threw a stone that hit a man demonstrates that he has been making bad decisions since a child. Despite their parenting flaws, they visit Steve in jail and attend the trial which illustrates that they support their son.